Last edited by Mezimuro
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

4 edition of Issues in supportive care of cancer patients found in the catalog.

Issues in supportive care of cancer patients

  • 140 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Nijhoff, Distributor for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers in Boston, Norwell, MA, USA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cancer -- Palliative treatment.,
  • Cancer -- Patients -- Rehabilitation.,
  • Cancer -- Treatment -- Complications.,
  • Neoplasms -- therapy.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies and index.

    Statementedited by Donald J. Higby.
    SeriesCancer treatment and research ;, CTAR 30, Cancer treatment and research ;, v. 30.
    ContributionsHigby, Donald J.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC262 .I83 1986
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 220 p. ;
    Number of Pages220
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2719111M
    ISBN 100898388163
    LC Control Number86012421

    Supportive Cancer Therapy. Latest issue All issues. Latest issues. Volume 4, Issue 4. pp. – (September ) Volume 4, Issue 3. pp. – (May ) Rapid and Sustained Influence of Intravenous Zoledronic Acid on Course of Pain and Analgesics Consumption in Patients with Cancer with Bone Metastases: A Multicenter Open-Label. A Practical Guide for Maintaining Your Quality of Life While Living with Cancer by Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA Cancer Supportive & Survivorship Care, Back to the Table of Contents. Everyone's Guide to Cancer Supportive Care A Comprehensive handbook for Patients and Their Families Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora.

      Supportive Care of Children with Cancer is a ready-reference handbook designed for use at the hospital bedside, in the oncology outpatient clinic, or in the physician's office. To create this book, leading experts in the field recommended approaches to supportive care which were then critically reviewed by members of the Children's Oncology Reviews: 1. er when communicating with and ensuring quality care for patients with cancer. Erikson () described the normal and evolving social and psy - chological traumas in the human life cycle. Although the immediate cri - sis of having cancer may seem to preclude all other issues.

    As members of the multidisciplinary cancer care team, oncology nurse navigators (ONNs) must understand these complications and be armed with effective interventions to support patients throughout the continuum of care. This article addresses issues related to 2 complications that commonly occur in patients with cancer: myelosuppression and pain.   The needs of cancer patients and their families are complex. Yet still more complex are the powerful social and cultural forces that shape the delivery of cancer care, and the way in which it experienced. Cancer Nursing: Care in Context addresses this by adopting a unique approach that situates cancer care in the context of society‘s attitudes to the disease, .


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Issues in supportive care of cancer patients Download PDF EPUB FB2

Scope. Supportive Care in Cancer publishes papers devoted to medical, technical and surgical topics as they relate to supportive therapy and care that supplements or substitutes basic cancer treatment at all stages of the disease.

The journal focuses on papers and reviews that report on intervention studies and policy-related issues to manage treatment-related toxicities and other supportive. Issues in supportive care of cancer patients.

Boston: Nijhoff ; Norwell, MA, USA: Distributor for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers, (OCoLC) Neurosurgical options in cancer pain management Pulmonary disease in the cancer patient The use of psychotropic medications in the treatment of cancer Psychological sequelae in the cured cancer patient Hospice care Cancer rehabilitation Early rehabilitation in cancer; a case report.

Series Title. Issues in Supportive Care of Cancer Patients. Editors (view affiliations) Donald J. Higby; Book. 5 Citations; Downloads; Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 30) Log in to check access.

Buy eBook. USD Instant download; Readable on all devices; Own it forever; Local sales tax included if applicable; Buy. *immediately available upon purchase as print book shipments may be delayed due to the COVID crisis.

ebook access is temporary and does not include ownership of the ebook. Only valid for books with an ebook version. During the course of editing 'Supportive Care in Cancer Therapy' (Martin us Nijhoff Publishers, ), it become apparent that several topics would have to await a second volume.

Furthermore, development of new informa­ tion and evolution of ideas continues. They provide holistic care to the patient and family or caregiver focusing on the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual issues cancer patients may face during the cancer experience.

Often, palliative care specialists work as part of a multidisciplinary team that may include doctors, nurses, registered dieticians, pharmacists, chaplains.

As an oncologist, I am always on the lookout for good patient education material. This book, which is based on the experience of the Stanford Integrative Medicine Clinic Cancer Supportive Care Program, is a good choice for a highly literate, print-oriented patient or family member.

The book is divided into five parts: (1) Cancer: Diagnosis, Information, and Treatment, (2) The. Rationale of Psychosocial Care for Cancer Patients.

Due to advances in early detection and medical treatment of cancer in the past 3 decades as well as the increasingly higher life expectancy of the population, cancer incidence rates continue to rise worldwide [].As a consequence of these trends, an increasing number of people will require medical treatment for cancer.

Palliative care (or supportive care) is medical care that focuses on relieving the symptoms caused by serious illnesses like cancer. It can be given at any point during a person’s illness to help them feel more comfortable. What cancer patients, their families, and caregivers need to. Dionne-Odom JN.

Hull JG, Martin MY, et al. Associations between advanced cancer patients' survival and family caregiver presence and burden. Cancer Med. 10 Feb DuBenske LL, Wen KY, Gustafson DH, et al. Caregivers’ differing needs across key experiences of the advanced cancer disease trajectory.

Palliat Support Care. ;6(3) supportive care from nurses and other professionals should accompany cancer treatment. the goal is to relieve pain and other symptoms, maintain general.

Supportive care is defined as “the provision of the necessary services for those living with or affected by cancer to meet their physical, emotional, social, psychological, informational, spiritual and practical needs during the diagnostic, treatment, and follow-up phases, encompassing issues of survivorship, palliative care and bereavement”.

More He also worked with hundreds of patients in in-depth psychotherapy and led ongoing support groups for patients with colon cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, and for husbands whose wives had cancer. All told, he met with over patients during his full time career. Join a Support Group.

Support groups can meet in person, by phone, or online. They may help you gain new insights into what is happening, get ideas about how to cope, and help you know that you're not alone.

In a support group, people may talk about their feelings, trade advice, and try to help others who are dealing with the same kinds of issues. Purpose: Delivering palliative/supportive cancer care (PSCC) early in the course of cancer care can enhance patients' and caregivers' quality of life, reduce anxiety and depression, and prolong.

Supportive Care of Children with Cancer is a ready-reference handbook designed for use at the hospital bedside, in the oncology outpatient clinic, or in the physician's office.

To create this book, leading experts in the field recommended approaches to supportive care which were then critically reviewed by members of the Children's Oncology. Cancer treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery.

Nursing Care Plans. Nurses have a huge set of responsibilities for handling a patient with cancer. Nursing care plans for cancer involves assessment, support for therapies (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation, etc.), pain control, promoting nutrition, and emotional support.

Supportive cancer care (SCC) has historically been provided by organizations that work independently and possess limited inter-organizational coordination. and suggests that there is a forum within which service providers can address system issues in a collaborative fashion.

Joint training programs/workshops refers to the participation of. Cancer is a life-changing event. Cancer Supportive and Survivorship Care becomes the fifth dimension to improve the quality of life for newly diagnosed cancer patients on therapy, as well as promote long-term survivorship.

If, for example, a single parent's denial of their illness is getting in the way of planning future care for a child, it might be necessary to intervene. Seek the help of a professional with expertise in the care of the dying, such as a hospice specialist, palliative care nurse, doctor or social worker.Now that you have had a brief introduction to supportive care, read pages of the Australian Clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of adults with cancer - Summary of Evidence.

Consider exploring one of the guidelines listed by reading the background evidence that supports the statement.Skirbekk H, et al. To support and to be supported.

A qualitative study of peer support centres in cancer care in Norway. Patient Education and Counseling. ; Embuldeniya G, et al. The experience and impact of chronic disease peer support interventions: A qualitative synthesis. Patient Education and Counseling. ; Hughes S, et al.